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>At work, the University of Limerick, we have a group of people called ITD – Information Technology Department. Recently, and over the last couple of days, they apparently had a problem that one (out of 256) computers in our user group (IDC) had been used for hacking. Hacking. First of all I’m delighted that our students actually hack. In my mind, that’s real programming. That’s exactly what I’m up to tonight. The friggin operating system isn’t good enough, other people’s lousy software is crap, and eventually you get angry enough at the sheer incompetence and ignorance and sit down and break your brain to write something that’s better. Much Better. Just to prove that the ignoramus are as incompetent as they appear. Well. To cut a long story short, our beloved ITD people decided to block all IP addresses in our block, all 256 of them, hence our web servers, groupware, etc., does not work for the outside world at the moment. If they get their act together, you’ll get my photos in previous postings. Otherwise, I’ll move the files to a server in the free world.

3 Comments

  1. >I think you have misunderstood the term hack. There are 2 derivations of the term, the term you use, where you over-ride the system function because it does not perform correctly, and the other term, where somebody forces entry to a system or database without permission and the intent to harm/break.That’s all. Thanks.

  2. >No, Mossy. The original definition is probably from the sound of typing fast on an old TTY terminal, especially by people trying to improve a system. real hacking is often misunderstood by the surrounding world, especially when a hack goes wrong (Whoops! There goes another worm). OTH, I’ve had many deep experiences of the power of recursion in the good old days of early virus writing. Way back then (mid-80’s) creating code with viral behaviour was sometimes really only good system programming. Then things got out of hand.

  3. >Noted. Thanks.


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